STOP B

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Addressing Health Disparities
  • 1 in 8 Asians are born infected with Hepatitis B (Hep B)

  • Hep B is contagious through blood and other bodily fluid transmissions

  • Hep B infection is a chronic condition and if left untreated, 1/4 of infected patients will develop liver cirrhosis or liver cancer

  • Hep B infection cannot be cured, but it can be treated with medication

STOP B is one of Pan Asian's flagship programs. Through it, we seek to spread awareness of Hepatitis B and help those who have been infected.

Hepatitis B is a widespread and potentially dangerous liver disease, caused by the Hepatitis B virus (HBV). It's one of the most common liver infections in the world, and has few visible symptoms.

Most people who are infected don't realize they have the virus. By the time they feel sick, it's often too late.

 


STOP B provides the following free services in order to combat Hepatitis B:

  • Hepatitis B screenings

  • 3-shot vaccine course*

  • Low-cost treatment

  • Outreach and education


* $20 donation encouraged for three shots course (to be completed in 6 months)
* $50 donation encouraged for two shots course (to be completed in 1 month)

There are no fasting requirements for the screenings. If you need treatment but don't meet the eligibility requirements, we will refer you to other community treatment programs.

Learn more about Hepatitis B and why it's important to get screened for it.


 

STOP B services are available at Pan Asian, on Fridays from 9am to 5pm.
Call 240-393-5950 if you have questions or to schedule a screening.

 

To find out if you're eligible for our services, please see the eligibility requirements.

Learn about our services to find out if we can treat your condition or symptoms.

To find out how to reach Pan Asian, please see the directions.

Most of our services are free; we welcome anyone who volunteers or donates so Pan Asian can continue to help people who need them.

 
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What is Hep B?

Hepatitis B is a widespread and potentially dangerous liver disease, caused by the Hepatitis B virus (HBV). HBV is easily transmitted via bodily fluids, and an infected person can transmit HBV to everyone in their family and to their friends. Mothers can transmit the virus to their unborn children, who are particularly vulnerable.

Hepatitis B is one of the most common liver infections in the world, since it has few visible symptoms. Most people who are infected don't realize they have the virus. By the time they feel sick, it's often too late.

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Did you know that...

  • One in every ten Asian-born people in the US is a carrier of Hepatitis B?

  • 75% of these people don't know they carry the virus?

  • Hepatitis B can be transmitted via body fluids?

  • The Hepatitis B virus can survive in the air for at least a week?

  • 25% of those infected by Hepatitis B will develop liver cirrhosis, liver failure, and/or liver cancer?

  • Hepatitis B is treatable with medication?


If you were born or grew up in Asia, Africa, South America, or Eastern Europe, and you don't know if you have HBV, it's vital that you get tested. Getting vaccinated will confer lifelong immunity, and the disease can be treated if you have it. But neither of these things will happen unless you get screened.

The only way to detect Hepatitis B is to have your blood tested for HepB surface antigen (HBsAg) and HepB surface antibody (HBsAb). Current standard liver exams don't include these tests. This means it's possible for you to be infected by HBV but have normal liver function according to the standard exam.

In general, a Hep B test can yield three possible results:

  • HBsAg: negative, HBsAb: positive - This means you were vaccinated or survived a previous infection, and are now immune to Hep B.

  • HBsAg: negative, HBsAb: negative - This means you aren't infected but also aren't immune.

       You should get vaccinated to ensure that you never contract the disease.

  • HBsAg: positive - This means you're infected and need to receive further examination and treatment.


 

To learn more about Hepatitis B, visit...

 

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